Wednesday, May 23, 2018

Autonomous vehicles versus pedestrians and bicyclists

Florida Weekly 'Outdoors' column, 5/23/18
danMOSER
bikepedmoser@gmail.com

Will a turning autonomous vehicle sense and avoid this pedestrian? COURTESY PHOTO

In a perfect world, self-driving cars could be the best thing that can happen to all users of our transportation network, including those of us on foot and bike. Currently available technologies that assist drivers are proving effective in terms of reducing crashes, injuries and fatalities, primarily among motorists and their passengers.

Features as basic as back-up cameras/sensors and tire pressure monitoring systems to those as advanced as forward collision warning with auto braking have been found to significantly reduce collisions between motor vehicles. The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety says that such systems reduce rear-end collisions by 40 percent and cut injuries by 30 percent in situations when a crash occurs. But the rush to move toward fully autonomous vehicles may be putting vulnerable road users even more at risk.

Removing human factor out of something as complex as operating a two-ton vehicle has both benefits and risks. Theoretically, when technology is working to its full extent and the human factor is removed the chances for error should be reduced to zero. But that assumes no mechanical or technological failings, something most of us who use any kind of technology would question as even being possible.

“What could go wrong?” comes to mind. From a more practical standpoint — at least in our lifetimes — most motor vehicles on our roads will not be fully autonomous but rather have some level of automation so there will still be the human factor mixed with technology. If used as envisioned this combination should improve safety for everyone.

The various business interests involved in developing and selling autonomous vehicles, as well others that will realize financial benefits by using them, are moving very quickly toward getting them approved and on the market.

Those who regulate these vehicles — government, from the feds to local jurisdictions — have been pretty generous in allowing testing on public roads of a technology and industry that’s still fledgling. While crashes, injuries and fatalities related to them have been few, serious flaws have been exposed that should give developers and regulators pause. One major shortcoming relates to the ability of driverless vehicles to adequately sense and safely operate around pedestrians and people on bikes.

Granted, the current environment on our roads for pedestrians and cyclists is shaky at best due to motorists’ inattention, poor judgment and just plain bad driving. But in the early stages of testing driverless vehicles we need to be mindful of their limitations.

As was stated by Bryan Reimer, Ph.D., associate director of the New England University Transportation Center at MIT, in a Consumer Reports article on the matter: “We think about these technologies as being highly intelligent. They’re not. What are machines doing here? They’re operating on behavior they have learned from us.”

Until these vehicles get beyond the “learning” stage, our public transportation system and the vulnerable users sharing them should not be used as live testing grounds. Any legitimate research trial would never put humans at risk without their agreement.

This issue isn’t going away anytime soon. You can stay abreast of how it affects non-motorists and what is being done to protect us at BikeWalkLee’s blog, bikewalklee.blogspot.com. Also, a homegrown effort to address our dismal traffic record is getting off the ground. Lee County departments, Lee Health and the Lee County Injury Prevention Coalition are seeking the organizations to be part of the solution. See www.visionzeronetwork.org to learn more. ¦


- Dan Moser is a long-time bicycle/pedestrian advocate and traffic safety professional who cycles, runs and walks regularly for transportation, recreation and fitness. Contact him at bikepedmoser@gmail.com and 334-6417. 

For Lee County cycling and tri events visit Caloosa Riders Bicycle Club (caloosariders.org); Florida Mudcutters (mudcutters.org); and SW Florida Biking Meetup Group (meetup.com/Biking-SWFL). The Florida Bicycle Association (floridabicycle.org) is your source for statewide happenings. BikeWalkLee’s blog site has all the information you’ll need to stay abreast of advocacy efforts in Southwest Florida as well as statewide and nationally.




Monday, May 21, 2018

May 21: Upcoming running/walking/bicycling/tri events

Upcoming events

Running/walking:
  • Monday, May 28: SNIP Collier Memorial Day 5K. Proceeds of the this race will go to SNIP Collier, a 501 (c) (3) non-profit organization. Our goal is to end the euthanizing of otherwise adoptable dogs due to the pet overpopulation crisis. 8 a.m. (gcrunner.org)
  • Monday, May 28: 2018 Sandoval 5K Run/Walk, 2573 Sandoval Parkway, Cape Coral (3dracinginc.com)
  • Saturday, June 9: Sugden Stride 5K, 7 a.m., Sugden Regional Park, Naples (eliteevents.org) 
  • Saturday, June 16: Veterans 5K, Estero Community Park, Estero (active.com)
  • Wednesday, July 4: Freedom 5K, 7 a.m., Cape Coral Bridge (ftmyerstrackclub.com)
  • Wednesday, July 4: USA Independence Day 5K, 7 a.m., Germaine Arena, Estero (eliteevents.org).
  • Wednesday, July 4: Moe’s Firecracker 5K, 7 a.m., Fleishmann Park, Naples (gcrunner.org)
  • Saturday, July 28: Eagle Lakes 5K, 7 a.m., Eagle Lakes Regional Park, Naples (eliteevents.org)
  • For more running events visit gcrunner.org/calendar.html; ftmyerstrackclub.com/race-calendar; and 3dracinginc.com

Cycling:
  • Friday, May 25: Cape Coral Critical Mass ride. Gather at 7:30 p.m. at 4706 SE 11th Place for a family-friendly ride through the Cape. Lights required, helmets recommended. (meetup.com/Biking-SWFL/events/)
  • Saturday, May 26: Saturday Slow Roll. 8 a.m. meet-up at 2160 McGregor Blvd. Recommended for inexperienced/young riders. Distance is 6 miles, includes group ride instruction. (meetup.com/Biking-SWFL/events/)
  • Friday, June 1: SW Florida Critical Mass ride. A family-friendly slow ride through Fort Myers starting at a special time: 7:15 p.m. Front and rear bike lights required. Grab your helmet, bring all your friends and meet in the open field next to Publix at First Street Village, 2160 McGregor Blvd. Fort Myers. (meetup.com/Biking-SWFL/events/)
  • Ongoing: Join the Caloosa Riders Bicycle Club on one of their many weekly rides for members and potential members, with an array of paces and routes to choose from. Check them out online at www.caloosariders.org.
  • For more Lee County cycling and tri events, visit Caloosa Riders Bicycle Club (caloosariders.org); Florida Mudcutters (mudcutters.org); and SW Florida Biking Meetup Group (meetup.com/Biking-SWFL).

Triathlons:
  • Sunday, June 3: Fitness Challenge Sprint Tri, Naples Beach Hotel & Golf Club, Naples (active.com)
  • Saturday, July 14: Englewood YMCA Sprint Tri, Englewood. (active.com)
  • Check trifind.com to find regional and state tris.

Monday, May 14, 2018

May 14: Upcoming running/walking/bicycling/tri events

Upcoming events

Running/walking:
  • Saturday, May 19: Cape Cops 5K. Proceeds from this event will be used to assist families of fallen and injured officers. 7:30 a.m., Cape Coral Yacht Club, Cape Coral (ftmyerstrackclub.com
  • Monday, May 28: SNIP Collier Memorial Day 5K. Proceeds of the this race will go to SNIP Collier, a 501 (c) (3) non-profit organization. Our goal is to end the euthanizing of otherwise adoptable dogs due to the pet overpopulation crisis. 8 a.m. (gcrunner.org)
  • Monday, May 28: 2018 Sandoval 5K Run/Walk, 2573 Sandoval Parkway, Cape Coral (3dracinginc.com)
  • Saturday, June 9: Sugden Stride 5K, 7 a.m., Sugden Regional Park, Naples (eliteevents.org)
  • Saturday, June 16: Veterans 5K, Estero Community Park, Estero (active.com)
  • Wednesday, July 4: Freedom 5K, 7 a.m., Cape Coral Bridge (ftmyerstrackclub.com)
  • Wednesday, July 4: USA Independence Day 5K, 7 a.m., Germaine Arena, Estero (eliteevents.org).
  • Wednesday, July 4: Moe’s Firecracker 5K, 7 a.m., Fleishmann Park, Naples (gcrunner.org)
  • Saturday, July 28: Eagle Lakes 5K, 7 a.m., Eagle Lakes Regional Park, Naples (eliteevents.org)
  • For more running events visit gcrunner.org/calendar.html; ftmyerstrackclub.com/race-calendar; and 3dracinginc.com

Cycling:
  • Wednesday, May 16: Ride of Silence, to remember cyclists killed or injured on public roadways. Centennial Park, Fort Myers, ride starts at 7 p.m. Details at www.caloosariders.org
  • Friday, May 25: Cape Coral Critical Mass ride. Gather at 7:30 p.m. at 4706 SE 11th Place for a family-friendly ride through the Cape. Lights required, helmets recommended. (meetup.com/Biking-SWFL/events/)
  • Saturday, May 26: Saturday Slow Roll. 8 a.m. meet-up at 2160 McGregor Blvd. Recommended for inexperienced/young riders. Distance is 6 miles, includes group ride instruction. (meetup.com/Biking-SWFL/events/)
  • Friday, June 1: SW Florida Critical Mass ride. A family-friendly slow ride through Fort Myers starting at a special time: 7:15 p.m. Front and rear bike lights required. Grab your helmet, bring all your friends and meet in the open field next to Publix at First Street Village, 2160 McGregor Blvd. Fort Myers. (meetup.com/Biking-SWFL/events/)
  • Ongoing: Join the Caloosa Riders Bicycle Club on one of their many weekly rides for members and potential members, with an array of paces and routes to choose from. Check them out online at www.caloosariders.org.
  • For more Lee County cycling and tri events, visit Caloosa Riders Bicycle Club (caloosariders.org); Florida Mudcutters (mudcutters.org); and SW Florida Biking Meetup Group (meetup.com/Biking-SWFL).

Triathlons:
  • Sunday, June 3: Fitness Challenge Sprint Tri, Naples Beach Hotel & Golf Club, Naples (active.com)
  • Saturday, July 14: Englewood YMCA Sprint Tri, Englewood. (active.com)
  • Check trifind.com to find regional and state tris.

Thursday, May 10, 2018

Cape is walking the walk


BikeWalkLee Column
The News-Press, 5/10/2018
by Ken Gooderham


If you like to walk in Cape Coral, the city has had a lot of good news for you lately.

The recent announcement that some five miles of sidewalks will be constructed in the next few years is welcome indeed. The additional mention that these projects will be in areas near schools is even better.

The fact that this project joins an ever-growing list of sidewalk efforts is the best news of all.

All this is solid evidence that Cape Coral is working to build on its recent (and successful) efforts to improve biking in the sprawling city – a mission made very clear in the recently (2017) adopted Bicycle + Pedestrian Master Plan.

You can find the complete plan online at: https://www.capecoral.net/department/parks_and_recreationhome/bike-ped/Report.pdf

The plan’s goals are:
  • Achieve Silver or Gold Bicycle Friendly Community designation by the League of American Bicyclists
  • Achieve Walk Friendly Community designation by the Pedestrian and Bicycle Information Center
  • Reduce the number of bicycle and pedestrian crashes by half within five years
  • Reduce the share of all bicycle and pedestrian crashes in Cape Coral that occur along Del Prado Boulevard, Cape Coral Parkway, Santa Barbara Boulevard, and Pine Island Road from approximately 50% to 25% within ten years
  • Double the combined walking, biking and transit commute mode share to 3% within 5 years (Currently 1.5% for walking, biking and transit in Cape Coral)
  • Create a 228-mile walkway network within 20 years (135 miles currently; 93 miles proposed)
  • Create a 202-mile on-street bikeway network within 20 years (66 miles currently; 136 miles proposed)
  • Create a 31-mile multi-use path network within 20 years (9 miles currently; 22 miles proposed)

Focused goals, tangible results and a specific timetable… this might just happen!

That would be good news for Cape students (safer routes to school) bikers/walkers (more facilities and safer streets) and residents (more transportation options that could mean fewer cars). This kind of infrastructure is also going to be crucial as Cape Coral works to grow into its massive boundaries – 110 square miles of dry land plus 10 square miles of water – and as transportation alternatives become more necessary (because you just can’t build that many new roadways when your population races past a half-million).

While we’re congratulating the City of Cape Coral, kudos also should go to the Florida Dept. of Transportation (FDOT), which is funding much of this infrastructure investment. This kind of partnership can bring real results, and both governments should be thanked for making this happen.

Ride of Silence reminder

Those wishing to honor killed or injured cyclists should remember to join one of the two Rides of Silence being held in Lee County on May 16.

The Fort Myers ride, sponsored by the Caloosa Riders Bicycle Club, gathers by 6:45 p.m. to start at 7 p.m. from Centennial Park in downtown Fort Myers.

The Sanibel ride, sponsored by the Sanibel Bicycle Club in partnership with Matzaluna Restaurant and Billy's Bikes, gathers at 6:15 p.m. at Matzaluna (1200 Periwinkle Way) to leave at 7 p.m.

Riders are requested to wear black arm bands or red if they have personally been injured in a cycling versus motor vehicle accident. Everyone welcome, free of charge, and no registration is necessary. Helmets are required, lights are recommended no headphones please.

Lehigh meeting

If you live, work, or play in Lehigh and support the proposed 5.5-mile pathway that will connect Lehigh Acres Trailhead Park to the Lehigh Acres Community Park and the Harnes Marsh, allowing residents and visitors to bike or walk between these popular destinations, now is the time to make your voices heard. This proposed FDOT-funded project has been in the study/planning phases since 2013, and is now at the stage when alternative locations and conceptual designs are available for public input. It's important that pathway supporters attend this open house to show their support for moving forward to implementation of this important project.

The meeting will be 5-7 p.m. on Thursday, May 17, at the Veterans Park Recreation Center, 55 Homestead Road South, Lehigh Acres, FL 33936. The meeting will be an open-house format with no formal presentation.

Ready to ride or run?

Run? Some 5Ks ahead to get you moving: Turtle Trot 5K on May 12, 8 a.m., Lovers Key State Park, Fort Myers Beach; and the Cape Cops 5K on May 19, 7:30 a.m., Cape Coral Yacht Club, Cape Coral (details for both at ftmyerstrackclub.com).
 
Ride? Critical Mass meets up for its NE Lee ride tomorrow (May 11), and for its Sanibel ride Saturday. For the night rides, lights are mandatory; for all rides helmets are suggested. Details at meetup.com/Biking-SWFL/events/.

Both? Next up is the Cape Coral sprint at the Yacht Club on Saturday, May 12 (details at active.com or capecoral.net). Ahead:
  • Sunday, June 3: Fitness Challenge Sprint Tri, Naples Beach Hotel & Golf Club, Naples (active.com).
  • Saturday, July 14: Englewood YMCA Sprint Triathlon, Englewood (active.com)
  • Also, registration opened for the Galloway Captiva Tri on May 1; the race weekend is Sept. 15-16, with the kids’ events Saturday and the sprint tri Sunday.

TELL US ABOUT YOUR RIDE:

Have a favorite route you like to bike, or a unique walk you’d like to share with others? Tell us about it at info@bikewalklee.org, and maybe we can feature it in an upcoming column.

# # #

Ken Gooderham writes this on behalf of BikeWalkLee, a community coalition raising public awareness and advocating for complete streets in Lee County — streets that are designed, built, operated and maintained for safe and convenient travel for all users: pedestrians, bicyclists, motorists, and transit riders of all ages and abilities. Information, statistics and background online at www.BikeWalkLee.org. 


 

Wednesday, May 9, 2018

Hit those wheels — May is National Bike Month

Florida Weekly 'Outdoors' column, 5/9/18
danMOSER
bikepedmoser@gmail.com

Bike parking structures like this make clear how welcome cyclists are at this business in Estero.
As Southwest Florida’s weather turns from warm to nearly unbearable, much of the rest of the country is finally bidding farewell to an unusually long winter. Folks from up North are now able to ride bikes without having to deal with all that comes with the cold and other nasty aspects of winter. The League of American Bicyclists has recognized this turn of season annually since 1956 by designating May as National Bike Month.

Because May’s heat can be challenging for those of us in this part of the country the Florida Bicycle Association has designated March as Florida Bike Month. But the FBA also recognizes LAB’s Bike Month, as do many communities in Florida that take part in one way or another. The good news for Southwest Floridians is that the almost daily thunderstorms usually won’t begin before late in the month or early June, meaning conditions are still fine for cycling so long as the heat is taken into consideration.

National Bike Month consists of a number of elements: Bike to School Day is May 9; Mother’s Day, Sunday, May 13, is CycloFemme Day, intended to encourage women to ride and promote the value of doing so; and Bike to Work Week is May 14-18 with Bike to Work Day on Friday, May 18. Check in with BikeWalkLee at bikewalklee.blogspot.com for local events or see if your workplace has anything planned during the week or month.

Not technically associated with LAB’s activities but happening throughout the world during National Bike Month is Ride of Silence on Wednesday evening, May 16. It’s a slow-speed and somber ride to recognize all those who’ve lost their lives while on a bike. Fort Myers holds its annual ROS at 7 p.m. from Centennial Park downtown, and Sanibel will conduct its ride from Matzaluna restaurant, also beginning at 7 p.m. Visit www.rideofsilence.org for all other ROS locations.

Even if there’s nothing organized, why not ride to work alone or with a friend or co-worker? Or just make it a point to ride as much as possible during the month. Who knows, it may just become a habit once you realize how much satisfaction and benefit it provides.

While on the subject of cycling, I received some feedback on my previous column about road position that I’d like to share. As I’ve stated many times, having the right to the road comes with responsibility as well. Here’s what one reader wrote: “Having read your article, a few thoughts come to mind. I’m sure your knowledge of the law in this regard is correct. I had no clue about the Florida DOT laws in this regard and learned quite a bit from the article. I also noticed that you did not discuss the fact that bicycles also are obliged to follow the rules of the road, same as cars. Living in Bonita Bay, I notice bikers do not think they need to stop for stop signs — ever! I believe this behavior and the fact that a bicyclist riding in the center of a lane at say 15 mph and holding up traffic instills in the driver a negative feeling that just may outweigh the slim possibility of being hit by a side mirror if hugging the right side of the lane. If a car was driving at 15 mph in front of you on a 30 mph road I’m thinking you may become a little impatient. I know I would.”

The issue of cyclists blowing stop signs and red lights is one I hear about a lot. While I’d like to see the Idaho Stop Law in place throughout the country (Title 49, Chapter 7, 49-720; cyclists may treat a red light as a STOP sign and a STOP sign as a YIELD sign), this is not the case in Florida and, as far as I’ve been able to determine only Delaware and parts of Colorado have some version of it.

So, particularly at locations where there are many eyes on us, it’s imperative that we obey traffic law pertaining to stopping. Flaunting the law — which also means being unpredictable — gives all cyclists a bad name and perpetuates the belief among many motorists (and some law enforcers) that cyclists should not be allowed to use the road when a pathway exists or at least must hug the gutter when in the travel lane. For those who routinely ignore traffic law when on a bike, please consider the overall effect of your behavior on your fellow cyclists and yourself. There’s no need to give certain motorists justification for disrespecting cyclists. ¦

- Dan Moser is a long-time bicycle/pedestrian advocate and traffic safety professional who cycles, runs and walks regularly for transportation, recreation and fitness. Contact him at bikepedmoser@gmail.com and 334-6417. 

For Lee County cycling and tri events visit Caloosa Riders Bicycle Club (caloosariders.org); Florida Mudcutters (mudcutters.org); and SW Florida Biking Meetup Group (meetup.com/Biking-SWFL). The Florida Bicycle Association (floridabicycle.org) is your source for statewide happenings. BikeWalkLee’s blog site has all the information you’ll need to stay abreast of advocacy efforts in Southwest Florida as well as statewide and nationally.








Monday, May 7, 2018

May 7: Upcoming running/walking/bicycling/tri events

Upcoming events

Running/walking:
  • Saturday, May 12: Turtle Trot 5K. This unique trail course takes runners through a shady maritime hammock ecosystem on a hard packed shell path. No part of the course requires running through beach sand. The course ends at the pavilion overlooking the beach where refreshments will be served and awards will be presented. 8 a.m., Lovers Key State Park, Fort Myers Beach (ftmyerstrackclub.com)
  • Saturday, May 19: Cape Cops 5K, 7:30 a.m., Cape Coral Yacht Club, Cape Coral (ftmyerstrackclub.com
  • Monday, May 28: SNIP Collier Memorial Day 5K, 8 a.m. (gcrunner.org)
  • Saturday, June 9: Sugden Stride 5K, 7 a.m., Sugden Regional Park, Naples (eliteevents.org)
  • Saturday, June 16: Veterans 5K, Estero Community Park, Estero (active.com)
  • Wednesday, July 4: Freedom 5K, 7 a.m., Cape Coral Bridge (ftmyerstrackclub.com)
  • Wednesday, July 4: USA Independence Day 5K, 7 a.m., Germaine Arena, Estero (eliteevents.org).
  • Wednesday, July 4: Moe’s Firecracker 5K, 7 a.m., Fleishmann Park, Naples (gcrunner.org)
  • Saturday, July 28: Eagle Lakes 5K, 7 a.m., Eagle Lakes Regional Park, Naples (eliteevents.org)
  • For more running events visit gcrunner.org/calendar.html; ftmyerstrackclub.com/race-calendar; and 3dracinginc.com

Cycling:
  • Friday, May 11: NE-Lee Critical Mass ride, gathers at 7:30 p.m. at the Winn-Dixie, 14600 Palm Beach Blvd. Lights required, helmets recommended.  (meetup.com/Biking-SWFL/events/)
  • Saturday, May 12: Sanibel Critical Mass ride, gathers at 7:30 p.m. at Jerry’s Shopping Center, 1700 Periwinkle Way, on Sanibel. Lights required, helmets recommended. (meetup.com/Biking-SWFL/events/)
  • Wednesday, May 16: Ride of Silence, to remember cyclists killed or injured on public roadways. Centennial Park, Fort Myers, ride starts at 7 p.m. Details at www.caloosariders.org.
  • Ongoing: Join the Caloosa Riders Bicycle Club on one of their many weekly rides for members and potential members, with an array of paces and routes to choose from. Check them out online at www.caloosariders.org.
  • For more Lee County cycling and tri events, visit Caloosa Riders Bicycle Club (caloosariders.org); Florida Mudcutters (mudcutters.org); and SW Florida Biking Meetup Group (meetup.com/Biking-SWFL).

Triathlons:
  • Saturday, May 12: Cape Coral Yacht Club Sprint Tri (active.com).
  • Sunday, June 3: Fitness Challenge Sprint Tri, Naples Beach Hotel & Golf Club, Naples (active.com)
  • Saturday, July 14: Englewood YMCA Sprint Tri, Englewood. (active.com)
  • Check trifind.com to find regional and state tris.

Tuesday, May 1, 2018

Join a Ride of Silence event on May 16th

 May has arrived and time to firm up your plans to join one of the two local Ride of Silence events (Fort Myers and Sanibel) on Wed. evening May 16th to honor fallen cyclists and promote road safety.

What began in 2003 in Dallas as a spontaneous outpouring of grief for a friend and fellow rider, struck and killed by the mirror of a passing vehicle, has rolled across the globe to become an international annual event memorializing and honoring cyclists who have been injured and killed while riding.

The Ride of Silence is a worldwide event, with almost all USA States participating, along with 22 other countries.


 
 

Previous Ride of Silence, Fort Myers
 The many hundreds of events share the same goals: "To honor fallen cyclists, to promote road safety, and to make a difference."

Bike safety is not a fleeting issue, especially here in Florida which ranks as the very worst in the nation for cyclist safety, with the highest fatality rate for ten years in a row.

In 2017, 4 cyclists were killed in Lee County crashes, in 2016, 9 cyclists were killed, and 1 cyclist has been killed in 2018 to date.





The Ride of Silence, in memorializing riders injured and killed, seeks to draw motorist's attention to cyclist's legal rights to full use of the roadways, to inform motorists that we are here, to watch for us--as if our lives depended on it. Please come out to show your support and send the message that we deserve our right to operate on our own roads. We are not just bike riders, but friends and neighbors and we must all Share the Road.

Locally there are TWO Rides of Silence planned--downtown Fort Myers and Sanibel.

Fort Myers Ride of Silence: Sponsored by the Caloosa Riders Bicycle Club
Arrive by 6:45, ride begins promptly at 7:00 PM
Centennial Park 2000 W First St, Fort Myers (Under the Bridge at Heitman and Bay Streets)
 
Cyclists will ride in a silent, funeral-style procession at 10-12 mph for 8 miles to honor those who have been killed or injured while cycling on public roadways.

Riders are requested to wear black arm bands or red if they have personally been injured in a cycling versus motor vehicle accident.
· Everyone welcome, free of charge. No registration necessary.
· Helmets are required, no headphones please.
· For further details email: ros@caloosariders.org or check CRCBC website.

Sanibel Ride of Silence: Sponsored by the Sanibel Bicycle Club in partnership with Matzaluna Restaurant and Billy's Bikes.
Gathering for Sanibel ride at Matzaluna's
 
  • Riders are encouraged to arrive at 6:15 p.m. at Matzaluna Restaurant (1200 Periwinkle Way) for a short educational program.

    · At 7:00 p.m. promptly the ride will leave Matzaluna's, down Periwinkle Way to the Sanibel Causeway. The ride will cross over the first 2 bridges of the causeway, do the turnaround under the main span, and return to Matzaluna (approximately 7 miles round trip).

    · Helmets required for all riders and front and tail lights are required if you plan to ride your bike home after dinner.

    · Matzaluna will provide discounted food and drink for all riders.

    · For further details, contact Salli Kirkland 239-472-3620.