Monday, June 26, 2017

June 26: Upcoming running/walking/bicycling/tri events

Upcoming events

Running/walking:

Cycling:
  • Friday, June 30: Cape Coral Critical Mass ride. Gather at 7:30 p.m. at 4706 SE 11th Place for a family-friendly ride through the Cape. Lights required, helmets recommended. (meetup.com/Biking-SWFL/events/)
  • Friday, July 7: SW Florida Critical Mass ride. A family-friendly slow ride through Fort Myers starting at 7:15 p.m. Front and rear bike lights required. Grab your helmet, bring all your friends and meet in the open field next to Publix at First Street Village, 2160 McGregor Blvd. Fort Myers. (meetup.com/Biking-SWFL/events/)
  • Saturday, July 8: Sanibel Critical Mass ride, gathers at 7:30 p.m. at Jerry’s Shopping Center, 1700 Periwinkle Way, on Sanibel. Lights required, helmets recommended. (meetup.com/Biking-SWFL/events/)
  • Sunday, July 9: 8th annual Wheels & Wings, 15-, 32-, 50- and 62-mile rides and a 40-mile Gravel Grinder plus more. Peace River Riders (www.peaceriverridersbicycleclub.com
  • Friday, July 14: NE-Lee Critical Mass ride, gathers at 7:30 p.m. at the Winn-Dixie, 14600 Palm Beach Blvd. Lights required, helmets recommended. (meetup.com/Biking-SWFL/events/)
  • Ongoing: Join the Caloosa Riders Bicycle Club on one of their many weekly rides for members and potential members, with an array of paces and routes to choose from. Check them out online at www.caloosariders.org.
  • For more Lee County cycling and tri events, visit Caloosa Riders Bicycle Club (caloosariders.org); Florida Mudcutters (mudcutters.org); and SW Florida Biking Meetup Group (meetup.com/Biking-SWFL). 
  •  
Triathlons:



Sunday, June 25, 2017

A Complete Streets champion bids farewell to Southwest Florida

Florida Weekly 'Outdoors' column, 6/21/17
danMOSER
bikepedmoser@gmail.com

Dan Moser
In the decades I’ve lived here and been involved in efforts to make our community safer and more accessible for pedestrians and those on bicycles I’ve had the pleasure of working with many smart and dedicated individuals.

Among these folks are a special few who have risen above and beyond what would otherwise be considered fitting in terms of their commitment and effectiveness. Dr. Margaret Banyan, a professor in FGCU’s Southwest Florida Center for Public & Social Policy, is one such special person.

Unfortunately for us, Dr. Banyan is moving back to her roots in Portland, Ore., a place from which many of her ideas and philosophy were born. But her influence and accomplishments will remain here and continue to motivate others to keep working towards making our public rights-of-way safe and accessible Complete Streets.

As a way to show how much Margaret is appreciated, BikeWalkLee broke from its usual protocol and is formally recognizing one of its own as the 2017 Complete Streets Champion of the Year. Such an honor is not usually bestowed upon a steering committee member from the coalition but an exception in this case is clearly warranted. Even were she not leaving, Margaret would be worthy of this award.

Darla Letourneau, left, and Dr. Margaret
Banyan,right, present a BWL award to
Billy Hattaway at Orlando City Hall.
Courtesy photo.
My Oct. 7, 2015, column focused on women leaders in our community and I wrote this about Margaret: “Margaret Banyan has brought her experiences from living in a place where being able to enjoy an active lifestyle without fear for one’s own safety and wellbeing is commonplace. Coming from Oregon and now working in academia she has made it her mission to convince the powers that be - from university leadership to elected officials and other decision makers in government - that focusing on walkability, bikability, and robust transit is necessary to have a livable community that attracts and retains the best and brightest.” One important aspect I failed to mention at that time was Margaret’s mentoring of students and citizen advocates into becoming leaders in the Complete Streets cause as well as other efforts to improve our community. So even when she’s no longer one of the driving forces here her influence and expertise will remain.

Those of us who have been working with Margaret will certainly miss her but we know she’ll be here in spirit. That spirit, as anyone who deals with non-motorized transportation, transit and community planning matters knows, needs to be one of persistence and patience because it’s an uphill battle.

Even though our decision makers are well aware of the infamous reputation we have for our pedestrian, cycling and transit environment (now confirmed by being ranked the most dangerous place in the U.S. for pedestrians, among other markers) turning that negative into a positive remains quite difficult. In Margaret’s case, even when addressing those less than supportive of her ideas and approach, she is able to keep her cool, remain a consummate professional, and provide facts, data, and solutions that make her case compelling, whatever the specific matter at hand.

One project Margaret’s been involved with since its inception is improvements being considered for Ortiz Avenue from Martin Luther King Boulevard/SR 82 to Palm Beach Boulevard / SR 80, a section that has very heavy pedestrian and bicycle use. The community would prefer the northern segment, from Luckett Road to SR 80, to remain as a two-lane street but with complete streets features.

Lee County, the road’s owner, wants it to be a four-lane highway that focuses on moving cars. Considering Lee County has a Complete Streets policy in place it’s hoped that they’ll follow their own policy and the will of the people who live in the area and drive, walk, and bike on this street.

Fortunately, from what Margaret has told us, she’ll occasionally be back here in her consulting capacity, continuing to make Southwest Florida a better place. For all Margaret’s done and will continue to do, we are grateful.

As stated by BikeWalkLee’s Darla Letourneau when the award was announced on June 17: “Today we honor Dr. Banyan as an outstanding champion of complete streets and livable communities in multiple capacities throughout Lee County over the past decade. As one of the founding members of BikeWalkLee, we also honor Margaret for incredible contributions to our organization since it was founded in 2009. Many of our successes would not have been possible without Margaret. While her leadership and commitment to the Complete Streets movement in SWFL will be greatly missed, she leaves a legacy of accomplishment, and an impressive group of talented young leaders who will carry the Complete Streets/Livable Communities movement forward into the future. BikeWalkLee is deeply grateful to Margaret for her many contributions to making our community a better place, and to being a key part of the BikeWalkLee Steering Group team from the beginning. We are confident that her contributions to the Complete Streets movement will continue wherever she goes.” ¦

- Dan Moser is a long-time bicycle/pedestrian advocate and traffic safety professional who cycles, runs and walks regularly for transportation, recreation and fitness. Contact him at bikepedmoser@gmail.com and 334-6417. 









Wednesday, June 21, 2017

How to keep your ride rolling down the road

BWL Column
The News-Press, 6/22/2017
by Ken Gooderham


People who like bikes like to ride. Makes sense.

Well, if you like to ride, you ought to like preparing your bike for that ride. That makes your ride smooth and increases the chances you’ll make it home in one piece and on both wheels.

Maintaining your bike is pretty simple, with one big qualifier: Be realistic about your mechanical skills going in. If your skills are basic, keep your maintenance efforts equally rudimentary. If your skills (and tool kit) are more extensive, you can consider tackling some of the more complicated maintenance items (which we’re not covering here… go online and you’ll find way more information than you’ll ever need).

So, the basics:

Before every ride:
  • Check your tire pressure. If you don’t know it, check the sidewall… but low pressure is the quickest path to a flat tire. Invest in a pump with a gauge built in and you’ll never regret it.
  • Check your tires for debris (to avoid a flat) and tread (to be able to stop and go as necessary).
  • Check your brakes… squeeze the levers and make sure the pads are engaging. If not, make the necessary adjustments (if you know how) or get to your bike shop (if you don’t).
  • Lube your bike chain… OK, not every time, but every other? Invest in chain-specific lubricant (not WD-40) geared to how or where you ride.
  • Check your gear and your toolkit… make sure both are in working order. If you don’t carry tools, carry a cell phone to call for help should a breakdown occur.

After every ride:
  • If you got wet, dry off your bike and components, and lubricate any moving parts (chain, brakes, gears, derailleur, etc.) with the appropriate lubricant.
  • If you had any problems, fix them (or get them fixed for you) NOW. There’s nothing more frustrating than heading out on your next bike ride only to discover that wobbly seat or squeaky pedal did not heal itself.
  • If you used anything from your tool kit, replace it… for the reason just mentioned above.

Regularly (interval based on your mileage)
  • Clean and lube your chain and gears, and look for degreasers and tools that are bike-specific and make it an easier chore.
  • Lube your brakes and check the pads for wear.
  • Clean your frame and check for cracks
  • Check your tires more thoroughly, and replace them if worn or brittle. If you’ve been having more than your share of flats, this is also a good time to upgrade your tubes and tires to more impervious materials that can stand up to the debris found on our roadways. There are number of choices and, if you’re willing to take on a little weight on your bike (not an issue for most of us) they can keep you rolling for a long time.
  • Unless you’re a serious wrencher, take your ride into the bike shop for a thorough review by one of their mechanics. That’s also a good excuse to wander through the store and see what’s new in gear and gadgets.

If you don’t know how already, the one skill you may want to develop is learning how to change a flat – particular if you don’t have the Kevlar-backed tires and thorn-proof tubes mentioned above. Most local bike shops are happy to show you how, and may even offer regular clinics on the skill. Learning how to change a flat and having the right tools on hand to undertake that mid-ride can save many a bicycling day… and it’s easier than you think.

Lighting the way

While you’re roaming the aisles at your local bike shop, check on the bike light options. If you don’t have some, consider making a purchase… and if you already have some, perhaps get some upgrades.

We’re seeing more bicyclists sporting lights night AND day, even front AND back. Typically, it’s a solid white light in front, blinking reds in the back… and while it’s not required (except at night), it can be a good way to be a little more visible to other riders and motor vehicles. That’s especially important if you ride in traffic or in the early morning/evening when visibility is at a premium.

The cost for bike lights is reasonable, and the safety they offer can be invaluable. Worth a look.

Ready to ride or run?

Run? Start planning your July 4th run, with three 5Ks to choose from: the Freedom 5K, Cape Coral Parkway/Bridge (ftmyerstrackclub.com); the USA Independence Day 5K, Germain Arena, Estero (eliteevents.org); and Moe’s Firecracker 5K, Fleischmann Park, Naples (gcrunner.org)

Ride? Critical Mass rides ahead? The Saturday Slow Roll is June 24 at 9 a.m.; the Cape Coral night ride is Friday, June 30, at 7:30 p.m.; the downtown night ride is Friday, July 7, at 7:30 p.m.; and the Sanibel night ride is Saturday, July 8, at 7:30 p.m. For night rides, lights are required; helmets recommend for all riders, and required for those age 16 or under. Details at meetup.com/Biking-SWFL/events.

Both? The American Sprint triathlon/duathlon comes to Naples July 2 (elitevents.org), followed by the Englewood YMCA Sprint Tri in Englewood July 8 (www.swflymca.org/programs/englewood-triathlon). Also, registration is open for the Galloway Captiva Tri Sept. 9-10… spaces are limited and the kid’s races usually fill up first, so don’t miss out.
# # #

Ken Gooderham writes this on behalf of BikeWalkLee, a community coalition raising public awareness and advocating for complete streets in Lee County — streets that are designed, built, operated and maintained for safe and convenient travel for all users: pedestrians, bicyclists, motorists, and transit riders of all ages and abilities. Information, statistics and background online at www.BikeWalkLee.org.

Monday, June 19, 2017

Dr. Margaret Banyan honored as 2017 Complete Streets Champion of the Year

On June 17th, BikeWalkLee presented Dr. Margaret Banyan with the 2017 Complete Streets Champion of the Year award.  BikeWalkLee, along with the larger transportation world in SWFL, owes a great debt of gratitude to Margaret for her decade-long efforts to put complete streets and livable community principles into action.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Issued June 17, 2017
Contact: Darla Letourneau, (239) 850-3219, dletourneau@bikewalklee.org

BikeWalkLee, a local community coalition advocating for complete streets in Lee County Florida, has selected Dr. Margaret Banyan, FGCU Associate Professor and a founding member of BikeWalkLee, as the 2017 Complete Streets Champion of the Year for her outstanding contributions to taking complete streets and livable community principles and putting them into action in the real world -- academia, government organizations, and local communities throughout Southwest Florida--for more than a decade.

Dr. Margaret Banyon
 “Today we honor Dr. Banyan as an outstanding champion of complete streets and livable communities in multiple capacities throughout Lee County over the past decade." said BikeWalkLee’s Darla Letourneau. "As one of the founding members of BikeWalkLee, we also honor Margaret for incredible contributions to our organization since it was founded in 2009. Many of our successes would not have been possible without Margaret," said Letourneau. 

Dr. Banyan's impact on the community is considerable thanks to  the various "hats" she wears and how she has used the synergy of those roles to introduce, educate and implement the concepts of complete streets, livable communities, a balanced transportation system, transit and transit oriented development, integration of transportation and land use planning, and community engagement. She has the unique opportunity to bring these ideas to both the future generation (i.e. her students), to government agencies and officials that make decisions on these issues, and to make them part of citizen community planning efforts.
 
BWL's Dan Moser presents award to Margaret
As the lead faculty for FGCU's land use planning certificate, she has trained and mentored many up-and- coming staffers and leaders in regional governmental and nongovernmental agencies and organizations. 

As a consultant to many local cities and community planning organizations, Dr. Banyan has worked to incorporate the principles of complete streets and livable communities into the fabric of the local government policymaking. Those many consulting projects gave her an opportunity to train her students about the real world of public administration and public policy, encouraging many to continue their careers in this field and to consider staying in Southwest Florida.

From her FGCU seat, she organized many seminars and workshops with national experts to introduce new ideas to our area, bringing in the area players from academia, government, consultants, advocacy organizations, community groups, along with students.

Friends and colleagues at Margaret's award presentation
She also played a critical leadership role on many government committees and task forces, which allowed her to move complete streets ideas into recommendations for government action:

  •  Within FGCU, she served on several committees to advocate for better bike/ped facilities, improved transit on campus, reconsideration of parking policies, and incorporation of these concepts into the Campus Master Plan. 
  •  She was chair of the county's Smart Growth Committee, which drafted the county’s Complete Streets Policy in 2009.
  •  She remained as chair and member of the reconstituted committee, the Community Sustainability Advisory Committee, as well as a member of its Complete Streets working group. 
  •  She was the Chair of the Tice Planning Community and worked tirelessly to improve the community and to develop its capacity and interest in citizen engagement.
  •  She also worked as a consultant on the development of the Community Plans for Buckingham and North Captiva, and provided her planning expertise to several Fire Districts.
  •   She was a member of the MPO's Citizen Advisory Committee and played a key role in the development of the Long Range Transportation Plans. She was a respected expert on transit and spoke at numerous MPO Board meetings on transit and related land use and transportation planning issues.
  • She was also selected by the MPO Board in 2015 to be part of its team to participate in the prestigious national Transportation Leadership Institute, focused on innovative uses of performance measurement for transportation investments. 
  •  She was chosen to be a panel member on the National Academies Panel on Livable Transit Corridors. She also served on the FDOT statewide committee developing its 2060 Plan.
CS Award Trophy
As an FGCU facility member, she successfully pursued grants for complete streets/livable community projects that would provide opportunities to partner with others in the community as well as provide opportunities for her students to participate. The awarded grants ranged from the national technical assistance grant from the Environmental Protection Agency for the walking audit and community engagement in the Tice community, to Health Improvement Assessments in Tice funded by the Centers for Disease Control, to the joint BWL/FGCU/Goodwill partnership that received a Southwest Florida Community Foundation grant to conduct walking audits in the Tice and Dunbar communities as a community empowerment and civic engagement tool.

"Over the past decade, Dr. Banyan's leadership and commitment to the complete streets movement has left a legacy of accomplishment, and an impressive group of talented young leaders who will carry the complete streets/livable communities movement forward into the future," said Letourneau. "BikeWalkLee is deeply grateful to Margaret for her many contributions to making our community a better place, and to being a key part of the BikeWalkLee Steering Group team from the beginning."

June 19: Upcoming running/walking/bicycling/tri events

Upcoming events

Running/walking:

Cycling:
  • Saturday, June 24: Saturday Slow Roll. 9 a.m. meet-up at 2160 McGregor Blvd. Recommended for inexperienced/young riders. Distance is 6 miles, includes group ride instruction. (meetup.com/Biking-SWFL/events/)
  • Friday, June 30: Cape Coral Critical Mass ride. Gather at 7:30 p.m. at 4706 SE 11th Place for a family-friendly ride through the Cape. Lights required, helmets recommended. (meetup.com/Biking-SWFL/events/)
  • Friday, July 7: SW Florida Critical Mass ride. A family-friendly slow ride through Fort Myers starting at 7:15 p.m. Front and rear bike lights required. Grab your helmet, bring all your friends and meet in the open field next to Publix at First Street Village, 2160 McGregor Blvd. Fort Myers. (meetup.com/Biking-SWFL/events/)
  • Sunday, July 9: 8th annual Wheels & Wings, 15-, 32-, 50- and 62-mile rides and a 40-mile Gravel Grinder plus more. Peace River Riders (www.peaceriverridersbicycleclub.com)
  • Ongoing: Join the Caloosa Riders Bicycle Club on one of their many weekly rides for members and potential members, with an array of paces and routes to choose from. Check them out online at www.caloosariders.org.
  • For more Lee County cycling and tri events, visit Caloosa Riders Bicycle Club (caloosariders.org); Florida Mudcutters (mudcutters.org); and SW Florida Biking Meetup Group (meetup.com/Biking-SWFL). 
  •  
Triathlons:



Monday, June 12, 2017

Want to get fit? Find a friend!

BWL Column
The News-Press, 6/8/2017
by Ken Gooderham


Photos: phitamerica.org
A new study was just issued on physical activity in America… and, of course, the news was not good. But if you look a little closer at a few of the findings, it’s possible to find a silver lining of sorts.

The study was the “Inactivity Pandemic” report for 2017, offered up by PHIT America, “a cause and campaign dedicated to increasing physical activity and fitness to improve the health of all Americans.” (PHIT stands for Personal Health Investment Today.)

 First, the bad news:

  • Physical inactivity is the fourth biggest killer worldwide… beating out obesity and sneaking up on high blood glucose (but still way behind high blood pressure).
  • Kids are becoming less active, thanks to a number of issues (and it’s not just technology or overly cautious parents). The PHIT group targets more activity in schools as one of its major goals, to help avoid earlier and more severe health issues as they age.
  • Income relates to activity… higher incomes equals higher activity while lower-income Americans are becoming more sedentary.
  • “Core” participants (3+ days a week) are dropping, while “casual” participants (at least one day a week) are dropping.
  • Physical education in schools makes a big difference… in keeping kids active outside of school and as they age, and in helping them learn while in school.
Here’s the glimmer of good news: When surveyed about what would get them more active, the Top 2 items people cited were having someone to be active with, followed by health and having more time/fewer commitments. (Better facilities were cited, but further down on the list.)

So, if you’re an active parent, make sure to have your kids join you in the fun. If you know someone who is interested in getting out and doing more, invite them to come along with you and see if you can jump-start the process. And if you’re the one who wants to get more active, work to find someone to share in that activity and see if you can start to make it a habit.

One thing that may help: If you look at the top activities for seriously active people, six of the top 10 and 11 of the top 20 are activities you can find in health clubs, etc. Look at the activities with the most growth recent, and health club items dominate.

So walking for fitness is still the top activity (and the easiest to do and the easiest on you), health clubs may offer you some motivation to get moving. (If nothing else, paying a monthly fee might get you moving to take advantage of it rather than wasting the money.)

One last bit of depressing new from the PHIT folks:
  • 10 million children are totally inactive.
  • 33 million children are not active to healthy standards.
  • Two-thirds of Americans are not active to healthy standards.
  • All of these trends are getting worse.

Walk this way

If this information inspires you to get up and go for a walk, good. But please walk in the proper direction.

For walkers and runners, that means facing traffic – particularly if you’re on a bike/walk lane or shoulders, in proximity to traffic. If you opt for a bike ride, then ride with traffic, almost without exception.

Why? Well, first it’s the law. More important, it’s safer for you.

Walking or running facing traffic lets you see what’s coming at you so you can adjust your course accordingly. Biking with traffic makes you more like a vehicle – and, thus, more likely to be seen by the bigger and faster vehicles you may have to contend with on the roads.

Ok, now get up and go for that walk.

Ready to ride or run?

Run? A few 5Ks ahead to keep you moving – Sugden Stride in Naples (eliteevents.org) and the Summer Sizzler 5K in Cape Coral (3dracing.com). Want something shorter and more informal? Consider trying one of the 2-mile Fun Runs being offered by the Fort Myers Track Club. The next one is June 20 in Cape Coral, and you can sign up at ftmyerstrackclub.com.

Ride? Critical Mass rides June 16 (Roll Estero at 7 p.m.), June 24 (Saturday Slow roll Fort Myers at 9 a.m.), an June 30 (Cape Coral at 7.30 p.m.). For night rides, lights are required; helmets recommend for all riders, and required for those age 16 or under. Details at meetup.com/Biking-SWFL/events.

Both? The American Sprint triathlon/duathlon comes to Naples July 2 (elitevents.org), followed by the Englewood YMCA Sprint Tri in Englewood July 8 (www.swflymca.org/programs/englewood-triathlon). Also, registration is open for the Galloway Captiva Tri Sept. 9-10… spaces are limited and the kid’s races usually fill up first, so don’t miss out.

# # #

Ken Gooderham writes this on behalf of BikeWalkLee, a community coalition raising public awareness and advocating for complete streets in Lee County — streets that are designed, built, operated and maintained for safe and convenient travel for all users: pedestrians, bicyclists, motorists, and transit riders of all ages and abilities. Information, statistics and background online at www.BikeWalkLee.org.

June 12: Upcoming running/walking/bicycling/tri events

Upcoming events

Running/walking:
  • Saturday, June 17: Sugden Stride 5K, Sugden Regional Park, Naples. Runners will have plenty of scenic views as they wind around Lake Avalon on a closed path inside the park. This is a spectator friendly course as athletes can be seen for most of the race.  Bring your swimming trunks because after the race, you can cool off in the clear lake or relax on the sandy beach. (eliteevents.org)
  • Saturday, June 17: 9th Annual Summer Sizzler 5K, Jaycee Park, Cape Coral. Races begin and end at Jaycee Park at the end of Beach Parkway in Cape Coral alongside the Caloosahatchee River. (3dracinginc.com)
  • Tuesday July 4: Freedom 5K, Cape Coral Parkway/Bridge (ftmyerstrackclub.com)
  • Tuesday, July 4: USA Independence Day 5K, Germain Arena, Estero (eliteevents.org)
  • Tuesday, July 4: Moe’s Firecracker 5K, Fleischmann Park, Naples (gcrunner.org)
  • Saturday, July 15: 9th Annual Beat the Heat 5K, Jaycee Park, Cape Coral (3dracinginc.com
  • Tuesday, July 18: 2-Mile Fun Run, from Run Florida (ftmyerstrackclub.com)
  • Saturday, July 29: Eagle Lakes 5K, Eagle Lakes Community Park, Naples (eliteevents.org)
  • Saturday, Aug. 12: 9th annual Cape 5K, Jaycee Park, Cape Coral (3dracinginc.com) 
  • For more running events visit gcrunner.org/calendar.html; ftmyerstrackclub.com/race-calendar; and 3dracinginc.com/.

Cycling:
  • Friday, June 16: Roll Estero, 7 p.m. at Our Lady of Light Catholic Church at 19680 Cypress View Drive, Estero. Lights required, helmets recommended. (meetup.com/Biking-SWFL/events/)
  • Saturday, June 24: Saturday Slow Roll. 9 a.m. meet-up at 2160 McGregor Blvd. Recommended for inexperienced/young riders. Distance is 6 miles, includes group ride instruction. (meetup.com/Biking-SWFL/events/)
  • Friday, June 30: Cape Coral Critical Mass ride. Gather at 7:30 p.m. at 4706 SE 11th Place for a family-friendly ride through the Cape. Lights required, helmets recommended. (meetup.com/Biking-SWFL/events/)
  • Friday, July 7: SW Florida Critical Mass ride. A family-friendly slow ride through Fort Myers starting at 7:15 p.m. Front and rear bike lights required. Grab your helmet, bring all your friends and meet in the open field next to Publix at First Street Village, 2160 McGregor Blvd. Fort Myers. (meetup.com/Biking-SWFL/events/)
  • Sunday, July 9: 8th annual Wheels & Wings, 15-, 32-, 50- and 62-mile rides and a 40-mile Gravel Grinder plus more. Peace River Riders (www.peaceriverridersbicycleclub.com)
  • Ongoing: Join the Caloosa Riders Bicycle Club on one of their many weekly rides for members and potential members, with an array of paces and routes to choose from. Check them out online at www.caloosariders.org.
  • For more Lee County cycling and tri events, visit Caloosa Riders Bicycle Club (caloosariders.org); Florida Mudcutters (mudcutters.org); and SW Florida Biking Meetup Group (meetup.com/Biking-SWFL). 
  •  
Triathlons:



Thursday, June 8, 2017

It’s sweltering, but hit the parks for great hiking, bike rides

Florida Weekly 'Outdoors' column, 6/7/17
danMOSER
bikepedmoser@gmail.com

Dan Moser
Getting out and about for recreation and exercise during the heat of Southwest Florida’s sweltering summer can be challenging for many of us, but with thoughtful planning it’s a great time of year for outdoor activities. June has been designated as National Great Outdoors Month as a way to encourage Americans to visit national, state and local parks. We have plenty of each to choose from in our backyard.

Here’s a sampling of what’s out there.

• Our national system includes J.N. “Ding” Darling National Wildlife Refuge (fws.gov/refuge/jn ding_darling), known by visitors for its paved, five-mile long Wildlife Drive, three-mile natural surface Indigo Trail and other nature trails, including one to a Calusa Indian shell mound site. But the refuge is much more than what most people know as “Ding” Darling. It’s actually quite expansive and is comprised of a number of natural lands and waterbodies, making it one of the nation’s largest protected areas.

• On my personal list of best parks anywhere in Florida is Lovers Key State Park. There’s a great beach as well as many miles of nature trails on which to hike, run or even ride bikes (skinny tires won’t cut it on these trails).

• Also managed by the state, a hidden gem that’s great for hiking and running is Estero Bay Preserve State Park, with access points at the end of Winkler Road off Summerlin Road and a trailhead on Broadway West in Estero. Very near that access point is Koreshan State Historic Site.

• On Pine Island one could make a full day out of riding the island-long bike path (16 miles, one way) and hiking the trails at Calusa Heritage trail. Go to floridastateparks.org for a complete listing of state parks in Southwest Florida.

• Excellent local parks abound throughout Lee County, many of them being part of the Lee Parks and Recreation Department system (leeparks.org), which also includes quite a few Conservation 2020 lands (conservation2020.org) that have had public access trails added to lands in their natural states.

The Tour de Parks Route links eight parks.
Dan Moser / Florida Weekly
• While too numerous to mention all of them, some of my favorites that offer opportunities for hiking and biking are Lakes Park in south Fort Myers; Caloosahatchee Regional Park and Hickey Creek Mitigation Park, both in Alva but on opposite sides of the Caloosahatchee River; Matanzas Pass Preserve on Fort Myers Beach; Prairie Pines Preserve in North Fort Myers; and John Yarbrough Linear Trail Park along Ten Mile Canal and the Seminole Gulf rail line. Yarbrough Trail is also the spine of the Tour de Parks route which links at least eight parks together in south-central Lee County (map can be found at leegov.com and bikewalklee.org).

• Other notable parks that are operated by other than Lee County government are Calusa Nature Center (calusanature.org) on Ortiz Avenue near Colonial; North Colonial Linear Trail and Trailhead Park (cityftmyers.com); CREW Land Trust properties (crewtrust.org) in east Estero; and Four Mile Cove Eco Preserve in Cape Coral. Cape Coral, which doesn’t have many large parks or public greenspace other than a few private golf courses, will hopefully have that fact updated if the city purchases the long-closed golf course property in the south-central area and transforms this sprawling parcel into a park (visit saveourrecreation.us for information about the efforts being undertaken to that end).

• One thing most of these parks and refuges have in common is that there are ample opportunities to get some miles in, often times under some shade. And by venturing out to our neighboring counties you’ll find many more to do the same. A few in particular make for good day trips: Charlotte Harbor Preserve State Park off Burnt Store Road in southwest Punta Gorda; Collier-Seminole State Park in southeast Collier County; Cape Haze Pioneer Trail Park in southwest Port Charlotte; and Lake Okeechobee Scenic Trail (LOST, dep.state.fl.us, floridahikes.com) a partially paved trail on top of the Hoover Dyke that will eventually be completely paved the entire 110 miles around the lake.

• For those willing to perhaps spend a night or two there are great places with miles of hiking and biking just up the coast on the Venetian Waterway Trail and Legacy Trail in Venice and Sarasota respectively; in Oscar Scherer State Park (floridastateparks.org) in Nokomis; at Fort Desoto Park south of St. Petersburg (pinellascounty.org); and on the 47-mile Pinellas Trail, which runs through many communities and environments (pinellastrails.org) north of the Skyway Bridge. ¦

- Dan Moser is a long-time bicycle/pedestrian advocate and traffic safety professional who cycles, runs and walks regularly for transportation, recreation and fitness. Contact him at bikepedmoser@gmail.com and 334-6417. 









Monday, June 5, 2017

Same old, same old: Cars over people


Florida Weekly 'Outdoors' column, 5/31/17
danMOSER
bikepedmoser@gmail.com

Dan Moser
Maybe if our elected leaders take an occasional walk and try to cross our busiest streets they will take seriously the fact that we have a major problem needing immediate and substantial attention. Reading the official notes from a recent meeting of the Metropolitan Planning Organization (leempo.com), which is comprised of representatives from all local governments, made clear that our elected officials still aren’t overly concerned about the fact that the Cape Coral-Fort Myers metro area (all of Lee County) is the most dangerous place in the U.S. to be a pedestrian. One comment in particular from a member who sits on the board confirmed the lack of concern and political will to do something about our dubious ranking.

The MPO meeting minutes noted that this elected official was concerned that Florida Department of Transportation’s plan to implement sorely needed safety features on Cleveland Avenue between the Edison Mall and downtown Fort Myers might create delays for motorists. Considering that this segment of U.S. 41 is one of our hot spots for injuries and fatalities involving pedestrians you’d think the member’s comment would have been focused more on whether the proposed safety improvements are enough. Another MPO member seemed more concerned with landscaping than pedestrian or motorist safety (there are no provisions in the plan presented to improve conditions for those using bicycles). Based on what I learned from the meeting minutes and many other dealings I’ve had regarding this matter, I’m convinced the Dangerous by Design report (smartgrowthamerica.org/dangerous-by-design) that deemed Lee County the worst-of-the-worst for pedestrian safety hasn’t had the impact on our leaders I’d hoped. So if being called-out by this report won’t cause our leaders to take action, what will?

Cleveland Avenue is a sea of asphalt with no refuge
to help pedestrians cross. Dan Moser/Florida Weekly
When the Dangerous by Design report was first released back in January, I said in my column: “What’s needed is a complete reset of our transportation network priorities and design standards. Anything less and we’ll continue to experience unnecessary and tragic loss of life, lives ruined forever by permanent injury, and significant economic losses to individuals and our community at large. If this doesn’t serve as a wake-up call to our elected officials, senior government staff, the business community, and the general public nothing will.”

Based on current traffic crash stats and the prevailing lack of concern among our elected and high-ranking officials it’s business as usual, meaning we’re not even close to moving in the right direction so perhaps it’s time to take a step that may not go over well with everyone.

What I’m thinking needs to be done to get the attention of those who matter and who can make a difference is to conduct a social media campaign that also focuses on those who don’t live here. Perhaps by getting the word out that Lee County is a risky place to visit or live because of our hostile traffic, bicycle and pedestrian environment but also because nothing of significance is being done to change this condition. Surely, some folks would have concerns about raising a family in such an environment, moving their business here, or even visiting, if there’s a good chance they won’t be able to take a stroll, bike ride, or even a drive without the fear of injury or worse.

Social media being what it is today, it won’t take a sophisticated marketing campaign and budget to get this message across. Personally, I keep my social media use to a minimum. I do, however, think I understand the extent of its reach and potential impact. This is indeed a drastic approach and not one I put out there without the concern of shooting ourselves in the foot by undertaking it. But considering the seeming total lack of concern (or, much to my surprise, even of lip-service) to address a problem that’s literally a matter of life and death I contend it’s a course of action that should be considered as a last option. I’d like to think the leadership of our hospitality, tourism, economic development and home building industries will put some pressure on our commissioners and council people to take our traffic safety problems seriously. From a solely local perspective, something like this can also spark discussion and shed light on the inaction among elected officials, something that just might make a difference to voters when deciding who should run our local governments next go-around.

As I’ve asked before in this and prior columns, if being called-out by this report won’t cause our elected leadership to take action what will? Maybe a harsh tactic such as this is the only way.

Until next time, I’ll look for you on the roads and pathways... Dan ¦

- Dan Moser is a long-time bicycle/pedestrian advocate and traffic safety professional who cycles, runs and walks regularly for transportation, recreation and fitness. Contact him at bikepedmoser@gmail.com and 334-6417. 





June 5: Upcoming running/walking/bicycling/tri events

Upcoming events

Running/walking:
  • Saturday, June 17: Sugden Stride 5K, Sugden Regional Park, Naples. Runners will have plenty of scenic views as they wind around Lake Avalon on a closed path inside the park. This is a spectator friendly course as athletes can be seen for most of the race.  Bring your swimming trunks because after the race, you can cool off in the clear lake or relax on the sandy beach. (eliteevents.org)
  • Saturday, June 17: 9th Annual Summer Sizzler 5K, Jaycee Park, Cape Coral. Races begin and end at Jaycee Park at the end of Beach Parkway in Cape Coral alongside the Caloosahatchee River. (3dracinginc.com)
  • Tuesday, July 4: USA Independence Day 5K, Germain Arena, Estero (eliteevents.org)
  • Tuesday, July 4: Moe’s Firecracker 5K, Fleischmann Park, Naples (gcrunner.org)
  • Saturday, July 15: 9th Annual Beat the Heat 5K, Jaycee Park, Cape Coral (3dracinginc.com)
  • For more running events visit gcrunner.org/calendar.html; ftmyerstrackclub.com/race-calendar; and 3dracinginc.com/.

Cycling:
  • Friday, June 9: NE-Lee Critical Mass ride, gathers at 7:30 p.m. at the Winn-Dixie, 14600 Palm Beach Blvd. Lights required, helmets recommended. (meetup.com/Biking-SWFL/events/)
  • Saturday, June 10: Sanibel Critical Mass ride, gathers at 7:15 p.m. at Jerry’s Shopping Center, 1700 Periwinkle Way, on Sanibel. Lights required, helmets recommended. (meetup.com/Biking-SWFL/events/)
  • Friday, June 16: Roll Estero, 7 p.m. at Our Lady of Light Catholic Church at 19680 Cypress View Drive, Estero. Lights required, helmets recommended. (meetup.com/Biking-SWFL/events/)
  • Saturday, June 17: LaBelle Slow Roll, 9 a.m. meet-up at 71 South Lee Street, helmets recommended meetup.com/Biking-SWFL/events/).
  • Sunday, July 9: 8th annual Wheels & Wings, 15-, 32-, 50- and 62-mile rides and a 40-mile Gravel Grinder plus more. Peace River Riders (www.peaceriverridersbicycleclub.com)
  • Ongoing: Join the Caloosa Riders Bicycle Club on one of their many weekly rides for members and potential members, with an array of paces and routes to choose from. Check them out online at www.caloosariders.org.
  • For more Lee County cycling and tri events, visit Caloosa Riders Bicycle Club (caloosariders.org); Florida Mudcutters (mudcutters.org); and SW Florida Biking Meetup Group (meetup.com/Biking-SWFL). 
  •  
Triathlons:



Monday, May 29, 2017

May 29: Upcoming running/walking/bicycling/tri events

Upcoming events

Running/walking:
  • Monday, May 29: SNIP Collier Memorial Day 5K.  8 a.m., 8004 Trail Blvd, Naples (next to Longhorn Steakhouse). Enjoy a wonderful 5K race that showcases the beautiful streets of Pine Ridge. This course will start and end at The Crust Restaurant. (gcrunner.org)
  • Monday, May 29: Sandoval 5K. 6 a.m., 2573 Sandoval Pkwy, Cape Coral. This 5K Run/Walk is in the Sandoval Community, starting at the club house and running through the beautiful palm tree lined  neighborhood streets.  It is intended for all ages, all levels of fitness! (3dracinginc.com
  • Monday, May 29: Memorial Day Veterans 10K and 5K race, Laisley Park, Punta Gorda (www.memorialdayrace.com or www.active.com)
  • Saturday, June 17: Sugden Stride 5K, Sugden Regional Park, Naples (eliteevents.org)
  • Saturday, June 17: 9th Annual Summer Sizzler 5K, Jaycee Park, Cape Coral (3dracinginc.com)
  • Tuesday, July 4: USA Independence Day 5K, Germain Arena, Estero (eliteevents.org)
  • Tuesday, July 4: Moe’s Firecracker 5K, Fleischmann Park, Naples (gcrunner.org)
  • Saturday, July 15: 9th Annual Beat the Heat 5K, Jaycee Park, Cape Coral (3dracinginc.com)
  • For more running events visit gcrunner.org/calendar.html; ftmyerstrackclub.com/race-calendar; and 3dracinginc.com/.

Cycling:
  • Friday, June 2: SW Florida Critical Mass ride. A family-friendly slow ride through Fort Myers starting at 7:15 p.m. Front and rear bike lights required. Grab your helmet, bring all your friends and meet in the open field next to Publix at First Street Village, 2160 McGregor Blvd. Fort Myers. (twitter.com/swflcm or meetup.com/Biking-SWFL/events/)
  • Friday, June 9: NE-Lee Critical Mass ride, gathers at 7:30 p.m. at the Winn-Dixie, 14600 Palm Beach Blvd. Lights required, helmets recommended. (meetup.com/Biking-SWFL/events/)
  • Saturday, June 10: Sanibel Critical Mass ride, gathers at 7:15 p.m. at Jerry’s Shopping Center, 1700 Periwinkle Way, on Sanibel. Lights required, helmets recommended. (meetup.com/Biking-SWFL/events/)
  • Friday, June 16: Roll Estero, 7 p.m. at Our Lady of Light Catholic Church at 19680 Cypress View Drive, Estero. Lights required, helmets recommended. (meetup.com/Biking-SWFL/events/)
  • Saturday, June 17: LaBelle Slow Roll, 9 a.m. meet-up at 71 South Lee Street, helmets recommended meetup.com/Biking-SWFL/events/).
  • Sunday, July 9: 8th annual Wheels & Wings, 15-, 32-, 50- and 62-mile rides and a 40-mile Gravel Grinder plus more. Peace River Riders (www.peaceriverridersbicycleclub.com)
  • Ongoing: Join the Caloosa Riders Bicycle Club on one of their many weekly rides for members and potential members, with an array of paces and routes to choose from. Check them out online at www.caloosariders.org.
  • For more Lee County cycling and tri events, visit Caloosa Riders Bicycle Club (caloosariders.org); Florida Mudcutters (mudcutters.org); and SW Florida Biking Meetup Group (meetup.com/Biking-SWFL). 
  •  
Triathlons:

Thursday, May 25, 2017

How to beat the heat


BWL Column
The News-Press, 5/25/2017
by Ken Gooderham

Photo credit: active.com
Yes, that last lingering cool front has blown away and summertime temps are here to stay.

Actually, this next stretch is worse than summer for temperatures. Until the regular summer rains kick in, there’s nothing to cut the afternoon heat… so heat indexes can be through the roof in late May and June.

If you like to ride, run or walk outside, how can you keep your cool (or some approximation thereof) until next October? It means making some adjustments:

  • Adjust your body. Work on staying active even as the temperatures rise. Your body will be better acclimated to the higher heat and humidity, and better able to cope with the stresses that brings.
  • Adjust your expectations. The workout you did in January won’t work in June, at least for most people. Experts recommend you exercise by exertion, not pace, adjusting your efforts to compensate for the toll heat takes on your body.
  • Adjust your route. Look for shade, avoid dark road surfaces (which radiate heat) if possible. Also check the wind direction… finishing your exercise heading into the wind will cool you off when you need it the most.
  • Adjust your timing. Get out early to beat the worst of the day’s heat, or go out late (very late if you going to let he built-up heat dissipate).
  • Adjust your wardrobe. Wear light colors, wear wicking materials, wear a hat and wear as little as you need to remain legal (and comfortable).
  • Adjust your hydration. Not only should you drink more, but include more than water to replace lost electrolytes. There are a number of ways to determine how much you need to consume to keep your body in balance… try them, since too little or too much hydration can cause trouble.
  • Adjust your location. Some days, the heat wins. If it’s just too hot to handle, or if the weather and your schedule won’t sync, head indoors (boring but temperature controlled) or head for the water (to swim, run in the pool, or just cool down after exertion).
The only upside? Those crowded bike lanes or shared use paths from last winter will be yours (mostly) alone to enjoy this summer.

No action on texting

Another legislative session, another whiff on efforts to make “no texting while driving” a more enforceable effort. Despite a number of bills working to elevate texting while driving to a primary offense (meaning you can be stopped and ticketed for it), state lawmakers failed to pass any of them (or even get them out of committee).

Yes, there is a statute banning texting while driving on the books, passed in 2013. But it makes the violation a secondary offense… meaning the driver must have done something else illegal (the primary offense) to then be cited for texting while driving. This leaves law enforcement with no recourse to respond to a distracted driver until they do something really wrong… such as hitting a pedestrian or cyclist.

In a perfect world, drivers would understand that being distracted while directing a large and heavy vehicle down the road isn’t a good plan. They’d put their phones away at least until said vehicle is fully stopped, and we wouldn’t need a law to make them drive right.

But this world is far from perfect... and, judging by the weaving and wandering too many driver of too many vehicles allow as they motor down the highway, it will take a primary and enforceable law to get their attention.

Maybe next year? Given the Legislature’s lack of attention, maybe not.

Ready to ride or run?

Run? Memorial Day means a 5K, with races in Naples (SNIP Collier Memorial Day 5K, gcrunner.org), Cape Coral (Sandoval 5K, 3dracinginc.com) and Punta Gorda (Memorial Day Veterans 10K and 5K race, www.memorialdayrace.com or www.active.com).

Ride? Critical Mass rides Friday night (Cape Coral at 7:30 p.m.), Saturday (downtown Fort Myers Slow Roll at 9 a.m.), and June 2 (downtown Fort Myers at 7:30 p.m.). For night rides, lights are required; helmets recommend for all riders, and required for those age 16 or under. Details at www.meetup.com/Biking-SWFL/events/.

Both? Still time to sign up for the Naples Junior Triathlon (kids only) June 3 (gcrunner.org) or the Fitness Challenge Reverse Tri in Naples June 4 (thefitnesschallengetriathlon.com). Down the road? The American Spring triathlon/duathlon in Naples July 2 (elitevents.org) and the Englewood YMCA Spring Tri in Englewood July 8 (www.swflymca.org/programs/englewood-triathlon). Also, registration is open for the Galloway Captiva Tri Sept. 9-10… spaces are limited and the kid’s races usually fill up first, so don’t miss out.

Tell us about your ride:

Have a favorite route you like to bike, or a unique walk you’d like to share with others? Tell us about it at info@bikewalklee.org, and maybe we can feature it in an upcoming column.


# # #

Ken Gooderham writes this on behalf of BikeWalkLee, a community coalition raising public awareness and advocating for complete streets in Lee County — streets that are designed, built, operated and maintained for safe and convenient travel for all users: pedestrians, bicyclists, motorists, and transit riders of all ages and abilities. Information, statistics and background online at www.BikeWalkLee.org.



Wednesday, May 24, 2017

Public input requested on Estero Parkway Improvement project

Do you want to make Estero Parkway a model complete street that demonstrates how one roadway can be redesigned to make it safer for all road users, esp. pedestrians and cyclists? If so, we need you to participate NOW in the Estero Parkway Improvement project getting underway in the Village of Estero, first by completing the Village's online survey about some of the options.

The Village of Estero is moving forward with plans to improve safety on Estero Parkway for all modes of transportation including vehicles, bicyclists and pedestrians and are looking for your input. On May 22nd, the Village website posted the following message.
You can help design an improved Estero Parkway
The Village has developed a new webpage dedicated to the Estero Parkway Improvement Project so that you can be part of the planning process.

You may use this page to fill out the Resident Input Survey, prioritizing your selections for layout of the road, bike paths and landscaping. (link to Survey)

In addition, you may read about previous meetings where the project was discussed, see dates of upcoming meetings, review public presentations and, once the project has started, review the timeline for project completion.

Estero Parkway was selected as the Village’s first capital improvement project due to safety concerns with this heavily traveled road which has deteriorating pavement, missing sidewalks and a lack of bike paths.

Before starting this important project, the Village wants to hear how residents would prioritize the improvements to this major roadway.

The Village wants to make sure the community is engaged in the overall planning process as this project will set a precedent for upcoming projects

If there is any information you would like to see included regarding this project, please call 239-221-5035 or send an email to publicworks@estero-fl.gov.


Background

In March, at a Village Council workshop, council members reviewed the staff's proposed approach for developing the Estero Parkway Improvement project. BikeWalkLee sent a letter to the Village Council recommending a holistic complete streets approach for planning Estero Pkwy improvements, rather than the staff's proposed approach of treating as separate projects--the road, the off-road bike/ped facilities, and beautification ((landscaping, signage, and lighting). To create a complete street, all these components are part of the whole and must be designed together.

Here are a couple of key excerpts from the BWL letter:

"To create a "complete street" all these components are part of the whole and must be designed together. For example, roadway medians and landscaping designs are tools for traffic calming, not just aesthetics. In order for landscaping to enhance the safety of the roadway for all users, the choice of type of vegetation and its location need to be safety-driven. To determine the best mix of tools for traffic calming, all the tools--hardscape, streetscape, and landscape--must be considered together throughout the design process. "

" Streets play an enormous role in determining a place's quality of life. While people may not know the term "complete street", they know the characteristics of their favorite streets-- streets with tree canopy and attractive landscaping; safe, comfortable and shady places to walk and bike buffered from traffic; moderate traffic speeds, safe ways to cross the street, and inviting places to be for all kinds of uses. The holistic and integrated planning of a roadway (the entire right-of-way public space) is context sensitive and reflects balance among the needs of the various users."

See BWL's extensive blog with links from the March Council discussion.

Although no formal action was taken by the Council, the implementation plan as presented at the March meeting has proceeded, meaning that the 3 components of the project (road, off road bike/ped, and beautification) are not being designed together. At the May 17th Council meeting the project consultant made a presentation on only the road project, including various options for the width of travel lanes and bike lanes. BikeWalkLee is pleased to see that Alternative 3 (11 foot travel lanes and 7 foot bike lanes) reflects FDOT's new Complete Streets Policy.    (See consultant presentation)

BWL’s Estero rep Doug Saxton sent an email to the Village Council and Village Manager on May 22nd (link email) articulating our concerns and questions about how this project is being designed and asked that there be an opportunity for an evening public interactive workshop to get input on the various alternatives under consideration.
BWL's Doug Saxton at Village Council

Below is a key excerpt from the letter:

While we are pleased to see the Village following FDOT's new complete streets design standards for bike lanes, a complete streets approach would be holistic--considering how all the pieces interact (roadway, shared use path, landscaping, traffic calming, etc.) and choosing the package that best meets the goals of safety for all users and for connectivity purposes. If Alternative 3 is chosen as the choice for resurfacing and striping of the road, what is the impact on that choice for the options to be considered for the shared use path? Does it rule out the option of a linear park? Does it imply less landscaping buffer, etc.? Does it preclude roundabouts? What options does it foreclose with respect to crosswalks and traffic calming treatments? If the iterative planning approach isn't modified, can this roadway decision be modified once the alternatives for shared use paths are considered? And same question regarding landscaping? Will there be an opportunity to make this a model complete street even if you don't take the needed holistic approach? 


Complete Village's Online Survey
Your opinion matters. It is important that Village Council and staff hear from citizens that there is a desire for a complete street approach on Estero Pkwy. It is also important to realize that this is not just about Estero Pkwy. --the design of Estero Parkway will serve as the template for future road roadway projects in the Village.

BikeWalkLee encourages you to fill out this online survey, which asked you to vote on several options.  Because no explanation for any of these options are provided, we suggest that you read both the March and May BWL letters before you fill out the survey. While there are options for the width of the bike lanes, there are no options presented on the off-road bike/ped facilities (sidewalk, shared use path, linear park). As you review the options, please consider all users of the road, whether you are strictly a driver or you would love to bike and/or walk if you had a safe environment. The context of Complete Streets is that everyone is far safer when we each have our own space on the road.


There are also a series of questions asking you to rank order your interest in 4 criteria:
  • Safety
  • Beautification/landscaping
  • Cost
  • Speed of project completion
Clearly, BikeWalkLee places the highest priority on safety.

At the end, there is a section inviting your questions/comments/concerns, which we encourage you to fill out, since so much is lacking from this survey. Below are some additional thoughts for your consideration:

• The public should be solicited for input once the entire project has been presented and only after everyone has had a chance to see the options and talk to consultants at public workshop.

• Lane diet to help calm vehicle speeds closer to the 45 mph posted speed limit.

• Note: Three Oaks Pkwy is already 11’ with a speed limit of 45 mph. Narrowing the travel lanes on Estero Pkwy will not affect the capacity or speed limit.

• Wide bike lane 6-7’ to accommodate bicyclists that prefer to ride along the road for added visibility.

• Wide shared use path (off the road) of 10-12’ or linear park to accommodate bicyclists and pedestrians of all ages and abilities.

• Other traffic calming measures such as roundabouts and landscaping. Potential roundabout locations on Estero Pkwy are:
• Cypress View and the Rookery community
• The Reserve and Cascades communities
• Walmart entrance/exit onto Estero Pkwy
• Street lighting for safety for those that bike or walk at night

Please share this with your friends utilizing any and all forms of social media so we can get the word out to people who live, work, or play in Estero, including FGCU students and facility.  You may also wish to send a letter to the Village Manager and/or Village Council members about your ideas and/or concerns related to the Estero Parkway Improvement project. (Steven Sarkozy: sarkozy@estero-fl.gov)

It is unclear what the next steps in the project are, but we'll keep you posted as soon as we hear about them. If you have any questions, please contact Doug Saxton: dpsaxton100@gmail.com.

Report by Doug Saxton and Darla Letourneau



Monday, May 22, 2017

The City of Bonita Springs and Blue Zones Adopt NPC Safety Tip Card


 Kudos to the collaboration of the City of Bonita Springs, the Naples Pathways Coalition (NPC), and Blue Zones of SWFL for adopting NPC's safety tip card.  Below is NPC's May Newsletter story.

NPC Notes
May 2017

The City of Bonita Springs and Blue Zones Adopt NPC Safety Tip Card

If you haven't been down Old 41 in Bonita Springs, you have to go. They are doing a remarkable job of implementing Complete Streets/Blue Zones planning that is making the city livable and safe for bicyclists and pedestrians as well as motorists. They are always on the lookout for good ideas, and NPC had one they liked.


When Scott Schnappauf, a member of the city's Bicycle Pedestrian Safety Advisory Committee, came across NPC's Safety Tip Card for bicyclists and motorists he thought it was a great educational tool and shared it with his group. Rather than reinvent they wheel, the committee suggested a collaboration.  Jessica Crane, Community Policy Lead for Blue Zones was instrumental in bringing together Bonita Springs Environmental Specialist and Sustainability Coordinator Sean Gibbons and NPC Executive Director Beth Brainard to seal the deal.

The results is a co-branded card that is being distributed in Lee as well as Collier County.  It offers safety tips to motorists on one side and bicyclists on the other in a quick, easy to read format. To date, more than 100,000 cards have been distributed physically and virtually.

NPC welcomes collaboration with other municipalities and neighborhoods. For information about co-branding, contact Beth Brainard (bethbraianrd@naplespathways.org).